My new year’s resolution.

December 19th's dinner at Gallery Provocateur

A lot has been going on as of late with new projects and new beginnings. And in between it all, I’ve fielded a lot of advice about fitting more “normally” into the Chicago food scene.

Despite the pleas for consistency, it occurred to me that normalcy is just something to which I have never been attracted. The way I dress, the girl I’m going to marry, the foods I like, the locations of my tattoos: nothing is normal, and I did that on purpose.

Also to add to that list is CRUX – an endeavor that will never be the same experience twice. Rest assured, I did that on purpose, too.

I get that it may not be the most socially accepted form of dining, but that doesn’t mean it has to be shunned or categorized for failure simply because it is different and unconventional. In an age of anti-bullying, we should uplift individuality instead of treating the underground like the bastard child of the industry.

Chefs constantly produce work where the outcomes are subjective. What’s a masterpiece to me is a piece of shit to someone else – understood. But what happened to just being happy for someone, starting with yourself?

Maybe the New Year is the perfect time for Chicago chefs to look at themselves, accept what others have accomplished, be proud of their own victories, and celebrate the uniqueness that keeps us all employed at our respective digs.

For me, 2011 featured failures and successes. I am proud of them all and even more proud to say that in 2012, CRUX will be traveling globally, working with UNICEF among other charities, and staging more thought-provoking pop-ups at various locations around the city.

Though I can’t speak for anyone else, my  New Year’s resolution will be to keep innovating and doing whatever possible to stand up against stagnation.

“A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to.”- Banksy

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One response to “My new year’s resolution.

  1. “I get that it may not be the most socially accepted form of dining, but that doesn’t mean it has to be shunned or categorized for failure simply because it is different and unconventional.”

    Someday, that’s going to be your pullquote in the way you put Banksy’s down at the bottom of this entry. So much related to food and dining as art or theater these days is sterile, from the musings of those who write about it in the NYTimes to the same tired purees on a plate. Shake it up this year. Make it happen. Continue not to subscribe to convention, and keep us in the loop about what you are creating and how you do it.

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